Political Science (POLS)

POLS 1101. American Government (3) 

An introductory level survey of the American political system in an international context, emphasizing across cultural approach to the study of the structure and processes of policy decision-making. The course incorporates comparison of the American political system and other types of political systems. The course also includes the study of world geography, emphasizing a knowledge of the global configuration of nation states.

POLS 2101. Intro to Political Science (3) 

An introduction to concepts and methods appropriate to the understanding and analysis of individual and group political behavior and political systems.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 2401. Intro to Global Issues (3) 

An examination of current global issues.

POLS 3212. State & Local Government (3) 

Provides an in depth study of the political process and administrative procedures used in American state and local governments to address social, economic, and political issues. Comparative analysis of relevant actors and strategies across the states is incorporated.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3220. Judicial Process (3) 

An introduction to the legal process as a whole, including the functions of courts, lawyers, and other actors in the legal system. Specific issues such as court reform, crime control, civil liberties, and civil rights will be covered. The Supreme Court and the development of constitutional interpretation through judicial decision-making will also be explored.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3231. Administrative Law (3) 

This course discusses the importance of administrative law, how administrative agencies operate and are held accountable, and how professionals in the private and public sectors interact with administrative agencies. It includes a discussion of statutory and constitutional law and the interplay of administrative rules with other sources of legal authority.

Prerequisites: PARA 1101 (may be taken concurrently) or LGST 1101 (may be taken concurrently) or CRJU 1150 (may be taken concurrently) or POLS 2101 (may be taken concurrently)

POLS 3308. American Foreign Policy (3) 

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the political and contemporary issues related to U.S. foreign policy. The course covers American foreign policy in the 20th century with an emphasis on national security issues. Then the course will proceed with an in-depth coverage of major groups and institutions involved in formulating American foreign policy. The particular focus will be on the roles of the presidency, Congress, executive branch (e.g., State Department), interest groups, mass media, and public opinion.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 3320. Public Policy (3) 

An analysis of selected public policy issues and the interplay of organizations and politics in the policy- making process.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3323. Comparative Politics (3) 

An introduction to the comparative approaches for the study of politics, focusing on patterns of development and change in contemporary political systems.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3324. International Pol. Economy (3) 

This course introduces students to the study of international political economy, an interdisciplinary field that examines the interaction between the state and the economy. It focuses on how the state and political process affect the economy and how organization of the economy affects political process. Key issues which will be addressed include: the role of states, international and domestic institutions in shaping trade, monetary and fiscal policies, foreign direct investments (FDI), and development.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 3326. Human Rights (3) 

Focuses on the historical roots of international human rights regime. It will examine the various actors and organizations in human rights debate, including: states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations and non-state actors. The course will challenge students to think as human rights advocates in the examination of issues such as the use of military force to promote human rights, war crimes, crimes against humanity, humanitarian intervention, women’s rights, child labor, human trafficking and the international Criminal Court (ICC).

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3329. Pol. of the Developing World (3) 

Provides students with an understanding of the diversity and complexities of the developing world, sometimes referred to as the “Third World,” “Global South,” “Less Developed World” and “Non Industrialized Countries.” It will examine the general characteristics of developing countries as well as illuminate many contrasting features. Similarly, the course will familiarize students with the many challenges that these countries face, and acquaint students with the various mechanisms used to measure the levels of development in the developing countries.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3340. U.S. Supreme Court (3) 

The course is an inside look at the U.S. Supreme Court. This includes the investigation of the Supreme Court as both a legal and political institution. Course discussion includes how cases make it to the Court, how the justices decide them once they're there, and what impact those decisions have in the real world. Overall, the course provides an introduction to the Supreme Court and provides a basis for further study in the field of Public and Constitutional Law.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 3343. Principles of Public Admin. (3) 

Examines the methods and procedures of governmental administration and the control of public bureaucracies in democratic societies.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3350. International Relations (3) 

International Relations examines the international order, conflict and war, determinants of foreign policy, global actors and the dynamics of political interaction between nation-states.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 3360. The U.S. Congress & Presidency (3) 

Provides an overview of the U.S. Congress and Presidency. Topics may include elections, voting behavior of Congressional members, political parties, the multiple views of the committee system, and the interaction between the branches of government. Character typologies of the presidency, the internal organization of decision-making in the White House, and the relationship of the presidency to the public and the mass media will also be discussed. A portion of the course may be devoted to an examination of the campaign and election process.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3370. The US Presidency (3) 

The U.S. Presidency examines the historical development of the presidency, the consitutional powers, the personalities, the roles and the relationship with other governmental entities.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 3380. Interest Groups & Pol. Parties (3) 

Examines the nature, structure, and functions of interest groups and political parties in differing national cultural contexts with particular attention to electoral activity and its role in the policy making process.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3382. Women and Politics (3) 

Provides an in-depth knowledge of themes pertaining to women in politics, both within the U.S. and the international sphere. Emphasis will be placed on the universal suffrage movements, women’s social movements, and the participation of women in politics and public policy.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3385. Campaigns and Elections (3) 

Provides an in-depth look at the process of selecting governmental leaders in the United States. Includes a segment on foreign elections.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3386. Mass Media and Politics (3) 

Examines the role of the mass media in society. Emphasis is placed on the media's role in the social, legal, and political processes in the United States, as well as other democratic and non-democratic countries.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3388. African American Politics (3) 

An examination of African American political behavior, including the theoretical underpinnings of political action, the electoral preferences of African Americans, and the role of African Americans in United States political institutions.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 3390. International Organizations (3) 

This course focuses on the ever-changing role that international organizations and non-governmental organizations play in international politics. Coverage will include theoretical and practical aspects of these organizations and the global problems that they attempt to address.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 4412. Urban Affairs & Problems (3) 

Urban Affairs focuses on the changing patterns of local and municipal governments and politics, impact of reappoint- ment and other problems generated by an urbanized society.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 and HIST 2111 or HIST 2112

POLS 4420. Political Philosophy (3) 

Political Philosophy is a survey of the political thought such great thinkers as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Hume, Hegel, Mill and Marx emphasizing the aspects of their thought most relevant to the development of Western political institutions.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 4421. Political Thought (3) 

Introduces normative political theories about the moral foundations of politics to try to answer questions about how the world ought to work. Political thought is therefore a component of the realm of philosophical inquiry known as “ethics.” The course covers different topics including, but not limited to, American exceptionalism, African-American political thought, and Feminist theory, but the focus will be on applying these to specifically political questions.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 4422. African Amer Political Thought (3) 

African American Political Thought examines major African American Political thinkers and activists. Historical and contemporary thinkers will be included.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 4424. Judicial Process (3) 

An introduction to the legal process as a whole, including the functions of courts, lawyers, and other actors in the legal system. Specific issues such as court reform, crime control, civil liberties, and civil rights will be covered. The Supreme Court and the development of constitutional interpretation through judicial decision-making will also be explored.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 4425. Constitutional Law I: Institut (3) 

Provides an in-depth study of the constitutional status of federalism, the separation of powers doctrine, and the constraints on the power of the United States Supreme Court by discussing relevant Supreme Court case law.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 4426. Constitutional Law II: Civil L (3) 

Provides an in-depth study of the fundamental principles of individual rights in American federal constitutional law. It surveys the areas of due process, equal protection, state action, and the Bill of Rights. The course will also cover the broader theories of constitutional interpretation.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 4427. Equal Rights in America (3) 

Equal Rights in America provides an in-depth investigation into the major accomplishments and shortfalls of the Civil Rights Movement from 1954-1968. It will also cover current equality issues that arose from and after this movement. These would include: gender, sexual orientation, immigration and economic inequalities.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 4428. Jurisprudence (3) 

The study of major topics in the philosophy of law concerning the relationship of law to morality, justice and social structure, the nature of law in general, the importance of the rule of law and limits to the rule of law; relevant legal theory, and examination of fundamental principles in specific areas of law and the application of legal concepts to contemporary American society.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 4429. Judicial Politics (3) 

The course examines courts in the American political system and specifically the Supreme Court. The course investigates the selection of judges, the flow of decisions through trial and appellate courts, the role of non-judicial actors, the considerations of judicial decision-making, and the relations between courts and other government institutions. Lastly, the course will examine the role of the legal, attitudinal, and strategic models of decision-making and how a perceived apolitical institution became the lynchpin of national political discussions.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 4451. Politics of Europe (3) 

Designed to acquaint students with political institutions and processed of individual European nations and regional organizations including NATO and the European Union in the post-Soviet era. Particular emphasis will be placed on analysis of the relations of these countries with the United States on selected issues of contemporary relevance. This course examines key countries and studies their political structure in detail.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101 and (HIST 2111 or HIST 2112)

POLS 4453. Politics of Africa (3) 

Examines contemporary sociopolitical and economic characteristics needed to understand the many countries of Africa. In addition, a

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 4454. Politics of the Middle East (3) 

Politics of the Middle East examines contemporary sociopolitical and economic characteristics needed to understand regional culture in the many countries of the Middle East/North Africa. The role of Islam, the Gulf War, the quest for development, the Palestine issue, and democracy versus authoritarianism are themes that will be covered in the course. In addition, a

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 4455. Politics of Latin America (3) 

Politics of Latin America is designed to acquaint students with political institutions and processes of nations in the region. Particular emphasis will be placed on analysis of the relations of these countries with the United States on selected issues of contemporary relevance. This course examines key countries and studies their political structure in detail.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 4470. Politics in Film (3) 

Examines U.S. cultural trends through films about politics. Shifts between cynicism and idealism in the media industry’s portrayal of politics will be examined. The difference between left and right wing propaganda and documentaries will also be examined.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 4475. Voting Behavior (3) 

This course gives students the chance to study and empirically test how voters form attitudes and opinions, what drives voters to the polls, and how voters make decisions. This course also covers voter turnout, partisanship, the role of the mass media in electoral coverage, and discusses the various models of voting behavior.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 and (MATH 1231 or MATH 1401 or MATH 3210)

POLS 4480. GA Legislative Internship I (3) 

GA Legislative Internship I will be offered to all students who get accepted to the Georgia Legislative Program (GLIP) hosted by Georgia State University. This section of the course requires 100 hours of internship work and a detailed account of the first 15 days of the Legislative Session. This course requires acceptance into the program by the GLIP Coordinator, the Political Science program coordinator, and the department head.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 4490. Internship - Political Science (3) 

Constitutes an independent (individual or small group) political science project applying social sciences methodology, research, and analysis to actual political environments. The student will prepare and submit a significant political science paper and/or project.

Prerequisites: POLS 2401

POLS 4491. GA Legislative Internship II (6) 

GA Legislative Internship II is the second course for students accepted into the Georgia Legislative Internship Program (GLIP) hosted by Georgia State University. This course requires 200 hours of internship work and a detailed account of days 16 - 40 of the Legislative Session. Acceptance into the course is contingent upon acceptance into the GLIP Program by the GLIP Coordinator, the Political Science Program Coordinator, and the department chair.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101

POLS 4500. Senior Capstone (3) 

Senior capstone learning experience required of all undergraduate Political Science majors. Students will use skills learned in the totality of their program to complete an original piece of empirical research under the direction of the POLS Program Coordinator and subsequent POLS faculty.

Prerequisites: POLS 2401

POLS 4501. Senior Thesis (3) 

Is the second course in a two course political science program capstone learning experience required of all undergraduate political science majors. Political Science majors will research and compose a written senior thesis on an approved topic under the direction of the POLS 4500 Senior Seminar and POLS 401 Senior Thesis course instructor/s.

Prerequisites: (POLS 1101 and POLS 4500)

POLS 4800. Selected Topics - Pol. Science (3) 

An exploration of contemporary topics and issues in the field of political science.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 4801. Selected Topics - Pol. Science (3) 

An exploration of contemporary topics and issues in the field of political science.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 4802. Selected Topics - Pol. Science (3) 

An exploration of contemporary topics and issues in the field of political science.

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or POLI 101

POLS 4900. Directed Study - Pol. Sci. (3) 

May be arranged in consultation with a faculty member and approved by the Program Coordinator.

Prerequisites: POLS 2401