Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 5000. Advanced Development (3 Credits) 

The exploration of seminal theories and theorists of human development, such as Erikson, Piaget, Bronfenbrenner, and Vygotsky. Students will learn the distinguishing features of the different theoretical perspectives, and there will be a heavy emphasis on evaluating how these theories influence practice in applied settings.

PSYC 5020. Cultural Issues in Applied (3 Credits) 

This course studies multicultural trends and characteristics of diverse groups, including how attitudes and behaviors are influenced by factors such as gender, race, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and disability. Students are encouraged to explore personal attitudes, stereotypes, biases, myths, and misconceptions about culturally diverse people and how these may impact therapeutic relationships.

PSYC 5040. Advanced Research Methods and (3 Credits) 

The first of a two-course sequence, this course focuses on the major methodological approaches utilized in clinical and developmental research settings. Emphasis will be placed on the common parametric approaches for evaluating group differences. Emphasis is also placed on understanding the fundamentals of the research process including how to design, conduct, analyze, report, and critically evaluate psychological research. Statistical computer packages will be integrated in order to learn how to practically apply descriptive and inferential statistics to the design and interpretation of experimental research methods

PSYC 5050. Advanced Research Methods and (3 Credits) 

The second of a two-course sequence, this course focuses on methodological strategies appropriate for use with small sample sizes, such as permutation testing, and nested data structures such as hierarchical linear modeling, commonly encountered in clinical and developmental settings. Statistical computer packages will be further integrated in order to learn how to practically apply correlation and regression statistics to the design and interpretation of quasi-experimental and non-experimental research methods. Emphasis is placed on students learning how to apply their mastery of research methods and statistics to generate a formal research proposal.

Prerequisites: PSYC 5040

PSYC 5110. Ethics in Clinical Settings (3 Credits) 

This course is designed to teach students to evaluate ethical issues related to applied professional practice in human services in a systematic way. Students will become familiar with professional ethics codes and develop an ability to apply these codes to a variety of problem situations. The course also examines ethical and legal standards, risk management, and professional credentialing.

PSYC 5150. Group Therapy (3 Credits) 

An exploration of the theory and practice of group psychotherapy. Emphasis is on learning how to develop and lead therapy groups. Experiential exercises will be included.

Prerequisites: PSYC 5350 and PSYC 5170

PSYC 5160. The Helping Relationship (3 Credits) 

This is a practical introduction to the skills needed to establish and maintain a successful therapeutic relationship, as well as an exploration of the various interpersonal and intrapersonal issues that may need to be addressed in such relationships. The course will include role-playing and other experiential exercise as part of the learning process.

PSYC 5170. Theories and Practice (3 Credits) 

This course presents theories and techniques of individual psychotherapy using a variety of models, including psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and integrative approaches. Emphasis is placed on learning to discern which approaches are best suited to individual clients and problems.

Prerequisites: PSYC 5160 and PSYC 5350

PSYC 5180. Advanced Theories & Practice (3 Credits) 

This course is a continuation of Theories and Practice of Psychotherapy I. It is designed to continue to introduce students to research and application of therapeutic techniques of individual psychotherapy using a variety of models, including behavioral, cognitive, manualized, and integrative approaches to particular mental health disorders.

Prerequisites: (PSYC 5170 and PSYC 5350)

PSYC 5190. Theories & Practice w/ Youth (3 Credits) 

This didactic/experiential course presents theories and techniques of individual psychotherapy with children and adolescents (ages 6-17) using a variety of empirically supported models, including but not limited to behavioral, cognitive, trauma-focused, narrative and play-based approaches. Emphasis is placed on learning to discern which approaches are best suited to individual clients and problems.

PSYC 5200. Family and Couples Therapy (3 Credits) 

This course focuses on assessment and psychotherapy with couples and families. Students will learn a variety of theories and approaches to working with the family system.

Prerequisites: PSYC 5160 and PSYC 5170 and PSYC 5180

PSYC 5210. Cognitive Development (3 Credits) 

A review of theory and recent empirical findings pertaining to cognitive and linguistic development from infancy to adolescence. Students will review both normative and atypical patterns of development and evaluate the relative role of genetics and environmental settings on the development of these domains.

Restrictions: Psychology - Graduate

PSYC 5220. Social & Emotional Development (3 Credits) 

An overview of theory and recent empirical findings pertaining to social and emotional development from infancy to adolescence. Students will review both normative and atypical patterns of development and evaluate the relative role of genetics and environmental settings on the development of these domains. In particular, students will evaluate literature focusing on important contexts of social and emotional development, including family, peers, and schools.

PSYC 5230. Biological Found of Behavior (3 Credits) 

This course is an advanced overview of the neural systems involved in the regulation of human behavior, focusing on the interactions between the cortical, limbic, and hypothalamic systems. Topics may include developmental neuroscience, learning and memory, behavioral disorders, stress, aggression, and common central nervous system disorders in both children and adults. A previous neuroscience course or courses is strongly encouraged.

PSYC 5270. The Ed System & the Child (3 Credits) 

This course uses an ecological approach to examine the impact of educational systems on the child. The course explores mechanisms of development based on the theories of Bronfenbrenner, Vygotsky and Erikson to shed light on how the educational system interacts with the child's risk factors, resilience, family environment, and early childhood experiences.

PSYC 5280. Dev. Disorders & Psychopath (3 Credits) 

This course will explore common developmental disorders and major forms of child and adolescent psychopathology, evaluate current etiological models and diagnostic standards, and review empirical evidence on current treatment approaches.

PSYC 5350. Adv Psychopathology & Diag (3 Credits) 

This course is designed to instruct students in the phenomenon of adult psychopathology and the present diagnostic system used by the majority of mental health professionals (DSM-IV). The course will consider psychopathology from a descriptive and etiological perspective as well as review theoretical and research contributions to our understanding of the etiology and maintenance of psychopathology.

PSYC 5800. Special Topics in Psychology (3 Credits) 

PSYC 5800 is a graduate-level course that will explore various topics and issues in the field of clinical, counseling, and applied developmental psychology. Topics covered will be chosen to meet the needs and interests of graduate students in the MS program in Psychology and will make use of the expertise of the faculty and consultants.

PSYC 6120. Intro to Psychological Assess (3 Credits) 

This didactic/experiential course will review and explore various theories and procedures in the administration, scoring, interpretation, synthesis and report writing for various observational, diagnostic and multi-informant assessments for adults, children and adolescents and their families. Relevant cultural, ethical and legal ramifications of assessment will also be explored.

PSYC 6490. Internship for Applied Psyc (3 Credits) 

Supervised field experience in an agency that provides services to children and families. Students will complete a minimum of 225 hours of documented work within the selected agency setting and will prepare a final report regarding outcomes of the internship for the course supervisor. Students must have completed a minimum of 15 hours of course work within the Applied Developmental Psychology Masters with a minimum GPA of 3.0 prior to enrolling in the internship. Requires permission of program coordinator for the Master of Science in Psychology.

PSYC 6500. Psychopharmac & Drugs of Abuse (3 Credits) 

This course will review theories and models from neuroscience and behavioral pharmacology including but not limited to major psychotropic medications and the neurological processes by which they operate, common drugs of abuse and processes involved in the addiction process and treatment of substance misuse within a culturally sensitive framework.

PSYC 6510. Grief & Crisis Intervention (3 Credits) 

This course will provide a foundation of the theoretical concepts associated with the impact and consequences of acute stress on victims, first responders, families, and community members, taking into account the process of grief and loss, complicated grief, dying, death, and bereavement, and the long-term consequences of unresolved trauma. Particular attention is paid to the treatment of the human stress response, effective counseling strategies, methods and techniques for immediate response, comorbidity, anxiety and depression, abuse, domestic violence, suicidology, impact dynamics of crisis and trauma, survivor guilt, and cultural sensitivity.

PSYC 6520. Career Development Theory & Pr (3 Credits) 

This course will provide a foundation of the theoretical concepts associated with career development theories, career and personality assessments, and the practice of career counseling. The focus will be on career development theories, concepts, models, assumptions, and research. Emphasis will be placed on lifestyle and career development, life-planning, assessment, and occupation information from a multicultural perspective and in a variety of career counseling settings.

Prerequisites: (PSYC 5170 and PSYC 5160)

PSYC 6590. Clinical Practicum (3 Credits) 

Supervised practice in psychotherapy in mental health settings. Students will complete a minimum of 225 hours of documented work within the selected agency setting. Requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 and permission of program coordinator for the Master of Science in Psychology.

Prerequisites: (PSYC 5170 and PSYC 5350 and PSYC 5160)

PSYC 6700. Graduate Directed Readings (3 Credits) 

Exploration of diverse topics under the guidance of faculty in the department. This course will allow students an opportunity to focus on content that may be of minimal focus within the regular curriculum but that is of particular interest and relevance to their personal professional goals.

PSYC 6800. Special Topics in Clinical Psy (3 Credits) 

PSYC 6800 is a graduate-level course that will explore various topics and issues in the field of clinical and counseling psychology. Topics covered will be chosen to meet the needs and interest of clinical graduate students and will make use of the expertise of the faculty and consultants.

Prerequisites: PSYC 5160 and PSYC 5350

PSYC 6885. Prof Identity & Practice (1 Credit) 

PSYC 6885 is a graduate-level course where program policies will be strengthened. In the course, students will also explore the professional functioning, credentials, and licensing criteria for master’s-level Clinical and Counseling students. Additionally, the course will address the roles and responsibilities of therapists in various settings as well as focus on developing and maintaining a professional identity in the field of professional counseling.

PSYC 6890. Professional Paper and Compreh (1-3 Credits) 

Completion of this course serves as a portion of the non-thesis degree completion option. This course entails two distinct components: preparation and oral defense of the professional paper and intensive preparation for the comprehensive exam, which will be taken during completion of Psychology 6899. Working with a faculty advisor, the student prepares a professional paper that demonstrates his/her mastery of theoretical and empirical information relevant to his or her specific training track (i.e. Clinical or Applied Developmental). Please see the MSP website for specific policies regarding successful completion of this course. Requires permission of program coordinator for the Master of Science in Psychology and student must currently have a 3.0 GPA or above.

PSYC 6899. Professional Paper and Compreh (1-3 Credits) 

Completion of this course serves as the second portion of the of the non-thesis degree completion option. During this course, students will finalize their professional paper and make all revisions that were required by their professional paper committee during the oral defense portion of Psychology 6890. Please see the MSP website for the full policy regarding completion of this course. Requires permission of program coordinator for the Master of Science in Psychology, and student must currently have a 3.0 GPA or above and must have passed Psychology 6890.

Prerequisites: PSYC 6890

PSYC 6900. Clinical Comprehensive Exam (0 Credits) 

Clinical Masters in Psychology students will enroll in this course in order to sit for the program comprehensive exam. The comprehensive exam is designed to assess the knowledge gained through students' matriculation in the Masters of Science-Clinical program.

Prerequisites: PSYC 5010 and PSYC 5150 and PSYC 5170 and PSYC 6520

PSYC 6995. Thesis Research (1-3 Credits) 

Working with a faculty advisor, the student develops and defends a research proposal and begins conducting the research. Students must have a minimum of 24 hours of course work with a GPA of 3.0. Requires permission of program coordinator for the Master of Science in Psychology.

Prerequisites: (PSYC 5040 or PSYC 5050)