Academic Conduct Regulations

Disciplinary action may be initiated by the University and sanctions imposed against any student or student organization found responsible for committing, attempting to commit, or intentionally assisting in the commission of any of the following prohibited forms of conduct.

Academic integrity is of paramount importance at Clayton State University. An act of academic misconduct may seriously compromise the learning process for the violator and for other students if it occurs without appropriate disciplinary consequences. Academic misconduct is defined by the following regulations.

  1. Disruption of the Learning Environment

    Behavior which disrupts the teaching–learning process during class or class related activities will not be tolerated. This includes but is not limited to belligerent, abusive, profane, distracting and/or threatening behavior. More subtle forms of behavior may also negatively impact the teaching-learning process and in some cases, may significantly impact the instructor’s ability to conduct the class. Possible examples (as deemed appropriate by each individual instructor as they establish their own unique learning environments) are listed in the Possible Examples of Disruptive Behavior section below and include but are not limited to: inappropriate attire, eating during class time, and unwillingness to participate in educational activities. A student who fails to respond to reasonable faculty direction regarding classroom behavior and/or behavior while participating in classroom activities may be dismissed from class (see Faculty Responsibilities).

    A student who is dismissed is entitled to due process and will be afforded such rights. Students should review the Procedures for Adjudicating Alleged Academic Conduct Infractions following any dismissal for academic misconduct. If found in violation, a student may be administratively withdrawn and may receive a grade of WF.
  2. Giving or Receiving Unauthorized Assistance

    No student will give or receive assistance in the preparation or completion of any assignment, essay, laboratory report, or examination to be submitted as a requirement for an academic course when not authorized by the instructor.
  3. Unauthorized Materials or Equipment
    1. No student will take or attempt to take, steal, solicit, or otherwise procure in an unauthorized manner any material pertaining to the conduct of a class, including but not limited to tests, examinations, laboratory equipment and grade books.
    2. No student will make use of any materials, aids, tools, or electronic devices not specifically condoned by the instructor in preparing academic assignments or while taking an examination.
  4. Furnishing Unauthorized Exam Information or Materials

    No student will sell, give, lend or otherwise furnish to anyone material which can be shown to contain the questions or answers to any examinations scheduled to be given at any subsequent date in any course of study offered by the University, without authorization from the instructor.
  5. Plagiarism and Misrepresentation of Work
    1. No student will represent the work of others as his or her own. Themes, essays, term papers, tests, presentations and other similar assignments must be the work of the student submitting them. When direct quotations are used, they must be indicated with quotation marks and when the ideas of another are incorporated, they must be appropriately cited.
    2. No student will submit the same assignment for two courses without the prior consent of the instructor.
  6. Violating Testing Rules and Procedures

    No student will give or receive assistance, or attempt to give or receive assistance; take, steal or otherwise procure any unauthorized materials; or otherwise commit an infraction of the established rules and procedures governing the administration of tests or exams, including for national or local testing programs.
  7. Falsification & Fabrication

    No student will provide unauthorized or false information, citation, or documentation in any academic exercise.

Possible Examples of Disruptive Behavior

Disruptive behavior includes, but is not limited to, the possible examples listed below. The examples are deemed appropriate by each individual instructor as they establish their unique learning environment.

  1. Non-Permitted Communication during Classroom Instruction
    • Talking while the instructor is talking
    • Talking before being recognized by the instructor (i.e. blurting out information)
    • Talking without permission during classroom instruction (i.e. side conversations with an individual or in a group)
  2. Excessive Communication during Classroom Instruction
    • Monopolizing classroom discussions
    • Failing to respect the rights of other students to express their viewpoints
    • Constant questions or interruptions which interfere with instructor’s presentation
    • Inordinate or inappropriate demands for time or attention
  3. Overt Inattentiveness
    • Sleeping in class
    • Preventing others from concentrating on classroom instruction
    • Working on tasks not associated with the current class, i.e., reading a newspaper, doing homework from another class, etc.
  4. Personal Attacks
    • Engaging in abusive or mean-spirited criticism of another student or an instructor
    • Questioning an instructor’s authority in front of the class
    • Continuing to insist on speaking with an instructor during classroom instruction
  5. Threatening Behaviors
    • Verbally abusing an instructor or student (i.e. cursing, taunting, badgering, intimidation or extremely loud talking directed at a particular person)
    • Threatening to physically harm an instructor, student, or self through verbal or body gestures
    • Intimidating through body gestures and/or posture
    • Refusal to comply with faculty direction
    • Harassment of instructor or other students
    • Intoxication (perceived)
    • Use of profanity or pejorative language
    • Physical violence
  6. Other Distracting Behaviors
    • Using electronic devices while class is in session when asked not to do so. These include but are not limited to cellular phones, pagers, text messaging, iPods, MP3 players, laptops, etc. 
    • Arriving late to class, especially on test dates
    • Creating excessive noise from packing up before class has ended
    • Dressing inappropriately as to cause other students or instructors to be distracted (i.e. wearing pajamas, indecent exposure, or offensive words on clothing)
    • Bringing children to class
    • Eating in class

Faculty Responsibilities

Faculty are to establish expectations for student course behavior. Faculty should set the tone for expected course behavior at the beginning of each term. This is best achieved by directly addressing policies regarding attendance, tardiness, decorum, student misconduct, withdrawal policies, and by referring the student to the CSU Student Code of Conduct. Faculty should remind students that any disruption of a positive learning environment in the classroom or actions which impede the ability of other students to learn or the ability of the professor to teach is a violation of the student conduct code.

Faculty should state in writing CSU’s Academic Conduct Regulations regarding disruptive student behavior and any other course policies in their syllabi. Faculty should clarify the definition of student misconduct, citing specific examples of misconduct that would result in disciplinary action. Disruptive behavior includes but is not limited to intoxication, belligerent, abusive (physically or verbally), profane, distracting, and/or threatening behavior. More subtle forms of behavior may significantly impact the instructor’s ability to conduct the class and may negatively impact the teaching-learning process. Some examples include: inappropriate attire, eating during class time, and unwillingness to participate in educational activities, etc. A more comprehensive list of specific example behaviors can be found in the Examples of Disruptive Behavior SectionAny statement beyond the above regarding disruptive behavior should be clarified in course documents including the syllabus.

Faculty should also provide students with an opportunity to get clarification regarding any course policies related to academic conduct in the classroom.. 

Faculty has the authority and responsibility to maintain a positive learning environment in the classroom. Faculty should remember that discussion and expression of all views relevant to the subject matter are permitted in the classroom, subject only to the responsibility of the instructor to maintain order. However, student behavior that disrupts the ability of other students to learn or impedes the ability of the professor to teach is a violation of the student code of conduct and should be addressed. To maintain classroom order, the faculty member has the right and responsibility to take the steps he or she deems necessary and reasonable, including private or public requests that the student(s) refrain from disruptive behavior.

Faculty members also have the responsibility to respond to students in a calm and objective manner. Even in the face of inappropriate behavior, it is imperative for faculty to maintain a professional and controlled demeanor with students in order to facilitate constructive interactions. 

A student who fails to respond to reasonable faculty direction regarding classroom behavior and/or behavior while participating in classroom activities may be dismissed from a course for the remainder of the semester. A student is entitled to due process (see “Conduct Process”) and will be afforded such rights, as soon as possible, by the processes described within the student handbook and student policies documents. If found in violation of the Student Code of Conduct, a student may, in addition to other outcomes, be administratively withdrawn from the course and may receive a grade of WF.